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In her serene interpretation of Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, Joy Drury Cox offers a fresh understanding of time and language. By simplifying this quintessential American tome to its most basic construction, Old Man and Sea evokes the literal and metaphorical elements of the trace. Honoring the original form of Hemingway's novel, Cox used vellum to trace and replicate each page by hand, and used the exact dimensions of her own well-worn copy of The Old Man and the Sea. Using Hemingway's periods as a guide, Cox creates new patterns and possibilities for understanding his familiar language.

In her serene interpretation of Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, Joy Drury Cox offers a fresh understanding of time and language. By simplifying this quintessential American tome to its most basic construction, Old Man and Sea evokes the literal and metaphorical elements of the trace. Honoring the original form of Hemingway's novel, Cox used vellum to trace and replicate each page by hand, and used the exact dimensions of her own well-worn copy of The Old Man and the Sea. Using Hemingway's periods as a guide, Cox creates new patterns and possibilities for understanding his familiar language.
In her serene interpretation of Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, Joy Drury Cox offers a fresh understanding of time and language. By simplifying this quintessential American tome to its most basic construction, Old Man and Sea evokes the literal and metaphorical elements of the trace. Honoring the original form of Hemingway's novel, Cox used vellum to trace and replicate each page by hand, and used the exact dimensions of her own well-worn copy of The Old Man and the Sea. Using Hemingway's periods as a guide, Cox creates new patterns and possibilities for understanding his familiar language.